Regular acupuncture shows improved PCOS biomarkers

pablo (90).png

"Infertility, acne, excess facial and body hair, weight gain, an increased risk for heart disease and diabetes: they're all common symptoms of PCOS, or polycystic ovary syndrome. Women who got a daily acupuncture session for six months showed the same improvements in male hormone levels, cholesterol levels, glucose and insulin markers, and weight as women who took prescription metformin pills three times a day, says a study in the latest issue of The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine."

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Study shows acupuncture may help period pain

pablo (94).png

"Women have normalised their pain and other symptoms. But [severe period pain] is not normal and not something they need to suffer." Dr Mike Armour

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Acupuncture may relieve pain of endometriosis

pablo (91).png

Endometriosis is a multifactorial, oestrogen-dependent, inflammatory, gynaecological condition that can result in long-lasting visceral pelvic pain and infertility. Acupuncture could be an effective treatment for endometriosis and may relieve pain.

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Acupuncture & herbs alleviate peri-menopausal symptoms

pablo (93).png

"Researchers find acupuncture and herbal medicine effective for alleviating peri-menopausal symptoms. Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine researchers find acupuncture and herbs a potent combination for relieving insomnia, hot flashes, mood swings, and fatigue in perimenopause patients. In a protocolized investigation, researchers developed a prescription of acupuncture points and herbs that synergistically improve positive patient outcomes. The combination of Chinese medicine treatment modalities provided significant relief to the patients in the controlled investigation."

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

Peri-menopause by poet Julia Grass

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Acupuncture: An Overview of Scientific Evidence

13909426_1637186853260505_8624615114034340915_o.jpg

Mel Hopper Koppelman, DAc, MSc, MSc recently concluded "Acupuncture enjoys moderate to strong evidence of effectiveness in the treatment of 46 conditions and is considered safe in the hands of properly trained practitioners. Acupuncture is also considered cost-effective for a number of conditions where evidence is available. Comparatively, for many conditions it enjoys greater evidence than many conventional treatments and is relatively safer. Patients, medical professionals, and healthcare administrators can be confident that the recommendation of acupuncture for many patients is a safe, cost-effective, and evidence-based recommendation."

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Acupuncture for colic

pablo (78).png

Minimal acupuncture may help infants experiencing colic, according to a new study published in the journal Acupuncture in Medicine. Infants experiencing colic—crying time more than three hours a day, for a minimum of three days a week— showed fewer symptoms after receiving minimal acupuncture treatment compared to the standard treatment.

Largely human acupuncture research has been conducted in adult populations with research often showing reduced pain, improved gastrointestinal function and increased calm. To see if it might reduce babies with colic crying time, researchers treated 147 babies between two and eight weeks old who had been diagnosed with colic.

The babies and their families visited a child health center twice weekly for two weeks and were assigned to one of three groups, . Parents in all three groups spoke with a nurse about their child’s symptoms, and two of the groups also received acupuncture.

Babies in the first group were given standard minimal acupuncture at LI4, a spot on the hand between index finger and thumb, for 2 to 5 seconds. babies in the second group received acupuncture at up to five locations on the hands and legs, for up to 30 seconds.

All of the parents kept diaries of how much time the babies spent crying at home. As expected after two weeks, all three groups were crying less since colic tends to resolve in time.

However the researchers noticed a greater reduction in crying time in both acupuncture groups than in the standard-treatment group, suggestive of a faster recovery. During the second week of the experiment, only 16 babies in the standard acupuncture group and 21 in the tailored group still met the criteria for colic, compared to 31 babies in the standard-treatment group.

The results also suggest that acupuncture could have a lasting impact. Six days after the final clinic visit, the differences between the acupuncture and non-acupuncture groups remained. Overall, there were no meaningful differences between results in the two acupuncture groups.

The babies tolerated the acupuncture well. Sleeping babies rarely woke during treatment, and 200 of the 388 treatments given involved no crying at all. Only 31 sessions involved crying for longer than a minute, and only 15 resulted in any bleeding. (In each of those cases, only a single drop of blood was noted.) Three families dropped out of the trial before it ended.

Fussing and crying are normal for babies, the authors point out, and the goal of treatment should be a reduction to normal crying levels, not complete silence. The authors also recommend eliminating cow’s milk from a baby’s diet before seeking acupuncture or other treatment. (This means choosing formula without cow’s milk protein, or, if a mother is breastfeeding, avoiding cow’s milk herself.) Doing so can help treat excessive crying; in the week long registration period for the study, this helped treat excessive crying in 269 of the 426 babies initially identified for the research.

Acupuncture is performed routinely in paediatric pain clinics in the United States, and has also been used to treat bed wetting, ADHD, nausea and constipation. In some cases, it allows less medication to be given: an important benefit for young children who are more sensitive to the effects of drugs.

Although research on infants is sparse, some earlier studies have shown promise for colic and pain. “I think that acupuncture is especially interesting in symptoms where there’s no other safe method or medication that relieves the symptoms, like in colic,” says study author Landgren. 

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Acupuncture for osteoarthritis

pablo (72).png

A Cochrane review published in 2010 presents what we know from research about the effect of acupuncture on osteoarthritis.

The review shows that in people with osteoarthritis,

-Acupuncture may lead to small improvements in pain and physical function after 8 weeks.

-Acupuncture may lead to small improvements in pain and physical function after 26 weeks.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the joints, such as your knee or hip. When the joint loses cartilage, the bone grows to try and repair the damage. Instead of making things better, however, the bone grows abnormally and makes things worse. For example, the bone can become misshapen and make the joint painful and unstable. This can affect your physical function or ability to use your knee.

According to the philosophy of traditional acupuncture, energy circulates in 'meridians' located throughout the body.  Pain or ill health happens when something occurs to cause this meridian energy circulation to be blocked. The way to restore health is to stimulate the appropriate combination of acupuncture points in the body by inserting very thin needles.  Sometimes in painful conditions, electrical stimulation along with the acupuncture is also used.  According to acupuncture theory, one way you can tell that acupuncture is relieving pain is that you may feel numbness or tingling, called de qi, where the needle is inserted.

Sham-controlled trials show statistically significant benefits; however, these benefits are small. Waiting list-controlled trials of acupuncture for peripheral joint osteoarthritis suggest statistically significant and clinically relevant benefits.

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Acupuncture for Migraine prevention

pablo (71).png

A Cochrane Systematic review published June 2016 concluded the available evidence suggests that a course of acupuncture consisting of at least six treatment sessions can be a valuable option for people with migraine. The available evidence suggests that adding acupuncture to symptomatic treatment of attacks reduces the frequency of headaches. 

The researchers findings about the number of days with migraine per month can be summarized as follows. If people have six days with migraine per month on average before starting treatment, this would be reduced to five days in people receiving only usual care, to four days in those receiving fake acupuncture or a prophylactic drug, and to three and a half days in those receiving true acupuncture.

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Chinese herbal medicine may reduce menstrual pain

pablo (73).png

Dysmenorrhoea is a very common complaint that refers to painful menstrual cramps in abdomen. Primary dysmenorrhoea refers to pain of an unknown cause (i.e. no medical condition is identified). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatorydrugs or the contraceptive pill have been used successfully for treatment but more women are looking for non-drug therapies. Chinese herbal medicine has been used for centuries in China and it is currently used in public hospitals in China for the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea. A Systematic review found promising evidence for the use of Chinese herbal medicine in reducing menstrual pain in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhoea, compared to conventional medicine such as NSAIDs and the oral contraceptive pill, acupuncture and heat compression. No significant adverse effects were identified in this review. However the findings should be interpreted with caution due to the generally low methodological quality of the included studies. 

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.

Low back and pelvic pain in pregnancy

pablo (75).png

A Cochrane Review reports that there is moderate-quality evidence for pain relief and improved functionality with acupuncture for low back and pelvic pain in pregnancy. 

I loved this quote from an editorial in the British Medical Journal:

Those caring for women with pregnancy related pelvic pain now need to press for increased availability of acupuncture.
— BMJ 2005;331:249

Please note that under national law claims of efficacy of treatment are required to be made with reference to evidence of a high standard. Traditionally acupuncture and moxibustion have been used to treat a wide variety of conditions however not all have been able to demonstrate evidence of efficacy within the constraints of clinical trials.

For further information on Chinese Medicine contact Dr Nicole Trudgeon (Chinese medicine Practitioner). Nicole is a practitioner of acupuncture and chinese herbal medicine (AHPRA registered) at her Booragoon clinic and is a Chinese Medicine Lecturer at the Endeavour College of Natural Health Perth campus.